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Silberio

water's taste

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Superheating water ftw!

Superheating is microwaving distilled water in a very clean container. The microwave will heat the water to a temperature above the boiling point, but since microwaves heat from the center out and distilled water doesn't have any imperfections, all the energy is stored. As soon as you brake the surface tension, scolding hot water goes all over. It's fun ... until you get burnt.

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well...one time the mythbusters proved that if you heat up water, in a micro wave, and then just touch it, it blows.

but do i get a High-damage-explosive if i mix water whit salt??

by the way, i found some kind of taste, crane water tastes crane

Edited by Silberio da' Great

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Hydrogen doesn't explode. It just burns very fast. Unless you put hydrogen in a sealed place and light on fire it will blow up the container because of the pressure.

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Hydrogen is more explosive / burns quicker than gasoline.

If you microwave water that already has salt in it, it won't do anything.

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Isn't Shell trying to make a hydrogen motor already? Or did I mix something up

@Righty: Got a vid of that? Sounds real fun :P

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@ tilly: i thinkthe reason people amy be getting confused is because of the fact that the elements that make up water (hydrogen, oxygen) are not atoms. But ions. ions are atoms that heve undergona a reaction whereby the transfer of electrons from (what used to be) the atoms 'outer shell'.

for example, oxygen has 18 electrons ( i just know that, ok?) and in an atom, on the first 'shell' of eectrons, there can be a maximum of 2 electrons, and on each shell thereafter there can be a max of8 electrons, giving oxygen the electron structure 2, 8, 8 (2+8+8=18 - duh..)

A reaction takes place due to the transfer of these elctrons. This can only happen if the max number of electrons on a given shell is not reached. For example, if an element had the electron structure of 2, 8, 6. It would, by the laws of physics, only react with an element which has one of its shells (besidwes the first ) with 2 electrons on.

Think about it like this: an atom wants a full outer shell, so it will become stable. a lack of this ceompleteness means it is reactive. However, when transferring electrons, atoms wil always take the 'easiest' option. i.e, will only give away/recieve a mximum of 4 electrons.

Think that's right,but if you wanna correct me feel free, if you wanna call me a geek, then you are grossly misunderstood...

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Ok... I'd like to contribute because people seem to be getting a bit mixed up here.

Water is a covalent compound, not ionic. Oxygen has 8 electrons - (2, 6). Hydrogen has 1 - (1).

The oxygen gains a full outer shell because the 2 hydrogen atoms bond with it covalently. The oxygen shares the atoms from the hydrogen atoms, thus having 8 electrons in its outer shell - making it stable. The electrons are shared in pairs due to the different orbitals. So there are four pairs of electrons altogether. Two shared and two unshared. This also allows the hydrogens to have full outer shells of 2. Voila! H2O

Water can exist in the 3 states of matter. Solid - Ice, Liquid - Water, Gas - Steam. Don't be confused by this... they are just the names people give them. Ice, Water and Steam are all essentially the same thing. They are just in a different state due to conditions. They are all H2O.

Also, water supplies are never going to be pure H2O. Of course for chemical or scientific purposes de-ionised water can be used, meaning there are no dissolved solids so its essentially "pure" - so it is possible in a sense. But tap supplies come from natural sources and they will have dissolved minerals - albeit in small amounts. These are good for you. Water suppliers may also use chemicals to make water safer to drink, like cleaning it with a chlorine compound to kill germs, adding a flouride to help protect teeth, or adding chemicals for pH adjustment. AFAIK, bottled water does not go through a rigourous treatment process but it will still have dissolved solids that have occured naturally and will do you no harm.

Edited by bryan

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ok, honestly, i didnt understand a word about that, just some stuff, please, make me a video whit bunnys so i can understand :lolbounce: ...lol, im joking, i know at least what's H2O.

and if H. is flamable (did i say it right?), then why dosnt water burn?

does it get neutral whit O.?

By the way, anyone got a video where H' and O' becomes water?

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Hydrogen doesn't explode. It just burns very fast. Unless you put hydrogen in a sealed place and light on fire it will blow up the container because of the pressure.

Hydrogen can surely explode.

It has 150 Iginition Point.It explodes the fastest.

@ tilly: i thinkthe reason people amy be getting confused is because of the fact that the elements that make up water (hydrogen, oxygen) are not atoms. But ions. ions are atoms that heve undergona a reaction whereby the transfer of electrons from (what used to be) the atoms 'outer shell'.

for example, oxygen has 18 electrons ( i just know that, ok?) and in an atom, on the first 'shell' of eectrons, there can be a maximum of 2 electrons, and on each shell thereafter there can be a max of8 electrons, giving oxygen the electron structure 2, 8, 8 (2+8+8=18 - duh..)

A reaction takes place due to the transfer of these elctrons. This can only happen if the max number of electrons on a given shell is not reached. For example, if an element had the electron structure of 2, 8, 6. It would, by the laws of physics, only react with an element which has one of its shells (besidwes the first ) with 2 electrons on.

Think about it like this: an atom wants a full outer shell, so it will become stable. a lack of this ceompleteness means it is reactive. However, when transferring electrons, atoms wil always take the 'easiest' option. i.e, will only give away/recieve a mximum of 4 electrons.

Think that's right,but if you wanna correct me feel free, if you wanna call me a geek, then you are grossly misunderstood...

Oxygen has actually 8 electrons.In the format 1s2,2s2,2p4.

Otherwise all other is correct.

And Bryan's right too.

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@ tilly: i thinkthe reason people amy be getting confused is because of the fact that the elements that make up water (hydrogen, oxygen) are not atoms. But ions. ions are atoms that heve undergona a reaction whereby the transfer of electrons from (what used to be) the atoms 'outer shell'.

for example, oxygen has 18 electrons ( i just know that, ok?) and in an atom, on the first 'shell' of eectrons, there can be a maximum of 2 electrons, and on each shell thereafter there can be a max of8 electrons, giving oxygen the electron structure 2, 8, 8 (2+8+8=18 - duh..)

A reaction takes place due to the transfer of these elctrons. This can only happen if the max number of electrons on a given shell is not reached. For example, if an element had the electron structure of 2, 8, 6. It would, by the laws of physics, only react with an element which has one of its shells (besidwes the first ) with 2 electrons on.

Think about it like this: an atom wants a full outer shell, so it will become stable. a lack of this ceompleteness means it is reactive. However, when transferring electrons, atoms wil always take the 'easiest' option. i.e, will only give away/recieve a mximum of 4 electrons.

Think that's right,but if you wanna correct me feel free, if you wanna call me a geek, then you are grossly misunderstood...

oxygen has 10 electrons.... and heres the electron shell 2,8,8,18,18,18.... and so on.

and electrons are negative, protons are positive.

when oxygen gains 2 electrons it is stable (or loses 6 but thats not easy) so. Hydrogen is near oxygen, hydrogen senses that oxygen isnt stable, oxygen senses hydrogen is not stable. the hydrogen jumps in and shares 2 electrons (notice it isnt ionic bonding, covalant) hydrogen is now stable, that makes HO. but oxygen still isnt stable and whats the closest thing to it? another hydrogen. the other hydrogen does the same thing and shares 2 electrons. everyone is stable and the molecule is neutral. not ionic.

and why the hell would you be a geek? im sure those millionaire atomic scientists arent being called geeks right now, driving away in there Ferraris.

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oxygen has 10 electrons....

Oxygen has 8 electrons - total.

Edited by bryan

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Hydrogen doesn't explode. It just burns very fast. Unless you put hydrogen in a sealed place and light on fire it will blow up the container because of the pressure.

Hydrogen can surely explode.

It has 150 Iginition Point.It explodes the fastest.

I've seen hydrogen burn. It didn't explode.

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^Then Hydrogen might be comming out of the source in limited Quantity.Like Butane comes in a Stove.

But if it is fully exposed it explodes.

Like petrol.You can have petrol Fire.Each time it doesnt explode.

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^Then Hydrogen might be comming out of the source in limited Quantity.Like Butane comes in a Stove.

But if it is fully exposed it explodes.

Like petrol.You can have petrol Fire.Each time it doesnt explode.

Everything thing that starts burning is an explosion. But Hydrogen explodes on a small scale. You won't be able to feel a shockwave from burning hydrogen. Why make hydrogen cars if hydrogen explodes?

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They are already developing engines to work on hydrogen...

Just to let you guys know.

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i understand now, as i've seen Discovery channel, a explosion takes place due to the pressure and bla bla bla...

so then water should burn?

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